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How To Be Safe While Celebrating Thanksgiving

As the days get colder and darker, it’s easy to hunker down in our cozy homes with loved ones. But Thanksgiving is a time for family traditions, so don’t let cold weather or your busy schedule keep you from spending quality time with those who matter most to you. As a health coach, I would like to stress the importance of keeping in mind that there are many dangers associated with this time of yea, and can be easy to forget about practicing safe protocols while having fun.

The Alabama Department of Public Health (ADPH) recommends integrating the following components, with COVID-19 vaccine as the major element for all eligible children, adolescents, and adults aged 5 and above. Booster shots are also suggested at least two weeks before holiday parties for groups of eligible persons.

Because the virus that causes COVID-19 is easily transmitted and can spread during shared meals and customary holiday activities involving many generations, this is the case. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention suggests the following precautions in addition to vaccines to reduce risk.

 

Here are some tips on how to celebrate Thanksgiving safely this year:

  1. When grocery shopping, in other public indoor situations, or when serving food, wear a mask.
  2. Before eating or serving food, wash your hands.
  3. If weather permits, it is safer to be outside than it is to be indoors.
  4. Make sure your guests are aware of your COVID-19 ground rules and the safeguards you’re taking ahead of time. If you’re unwell, cancel plans and keep away from people.
  5. Safe Travels. If at all possible, postpone your trip until you are completely immunized. Take extra measures if you’re traveling with unvaccinated family members, including youngsters who aren’t yet eligible for vaccination. Avoid crowds, wear a mask, and get tested before and after your trip to avoid becoming sick.

 

Following the Christmas season last year, there was an increase in COVID-19 cases. Despite the fact that COVID-19 instances, hospitalizations, and deaths are presently significantly lower than during the late summer peak, the virus’s path is unpredictable.

 

There is no single answer for all groups and families, and no danger can be completely removed. Staying at home and having virtual gatherings may be recommended again this year for certain individuals, families, or groups with fragile elders or people with chronic health concerns. When organizing your holiday events, keep others in mind, especially the immunocompromised and small children. Other tips for attentive hosts include letting visitors know what to anticipate before they come so there are no surprises, requiring everyone coming to receive a flu vaccination ahead of time, and requiring anyone who show signs of sickness to stay at home.

 

Your efforts can help prevent the spread of COVID-19. Effective and consistent safety measures should allow everyone to enjoy the holiday festivities by lowering the risk of contracting and transmitting COVID-19 and its severe outcomes.

 

Karin Adoni

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